The Loop IV

Behind in our blogs. Hope to catch up soon.

Finally we break out!!  After spending the night in Tonawanda, NY we leave the cut from Black Rock locks.   11 days humping it through the Erie Canal we’ve finally made it to the Great Lakes.  Just before making the bend around to the lake the air turned cool and crisp.  We could smell the big water.  We both had tears in our eyes as we made that final turn to Lake Erie.

Now we can hustle it up a bit and get offshore and let Shangri-La put on some speed (ok fine, it’s 8-9 knots) and stretch her props.  The Lake Erie run was unlike anything we expected.  First Buffalo.  Where we met other Loopers and Harbor Hosts who went out of their way to assist us.  Including grocery runs and a ride to the bus station where one day we hopped a bus to Niagra Falls.  Once again, the incredible community of boaters was there for us.

The Loop III

Journey around America’s Great Loop

Dawn breaks – geeze did I really write that?  Anyway, an early start today, we’re going outside!  The next leg of the trip is to head out into the Atlantic Ocean and make our way up the New Jersey coast to New York.  It’s a long  trip for us so we have two choices – run into the night, making the turn into the Hudson to our chosen anchorage at Sandy Hook, or stop at Atlantic City.  Duh, we all know how that turned out.  Across from the casinos is a quiet bay where we can anchor.  The channel into the anchorage is so narrow, the fishermen pull their lines so we can pass.  Once again we are treated to a serene evening, the lights of Atlantic City, about a mile away and us, hovering over the hook enjoying another tranquil evening.

Day 2 OUTSIDE.  It didn’t get rough and it didn’t get ugly.  We had a beautiful run up the coast.  It was easy to understand the term ‘down to the shore’ when we’ve heard it from folks in NY City.  Beautiful sand beaches the entire way up the New Jersey coastline.  Making the turn into Sandy Hook, we dropped our hook in a lovely bay – the only boat in sight.

During dinner, I caught something out of the corner of my eye passing in front of our windscreen.  A massive tug and barge used for dredging was literally running over our anchor line.  Leaping up, I got on the radio and asked if the captain was lost.  “Nope, just looking for a place to spend the night.”  He anchored out several hundred yards away – but that first look as he passed so close pretty much finished off the few hairs I had that were lacking grey. Continue reading “The Loop III”